Green Lawn Fertilizing – lime

As spring gives way to summer, lawn health can be tested by the increased temperatures and the threat of drought. The following tips are the best practices for maintaining a healthy lawn for the entire season.

Why Is My Lawn Acidic?

Why Is My Lawn Acidic?

Acidic lawns can be hard to notice without testing. It’s important to examine your soil and make sure that it isn’t too acidic for your lawn to grow properly.

Green lawns don’t simply happen overnight. There is a lot of care and nurturing that goes into a creating a lawn. But it’s not just your lawn that you need to care for. Sometimes it’s the soil.

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An unhealthy lawn is an eyesore, with many different colors, weeds, and dying turf. When your lawn becomes unhealthy, it’s important to take action.

If you are like many lawn owners, you may not even know what a soil pH level is, much less what your soil’s pH level means for your lawn’s health. Find out what your soil’s pH level may mean for your lawn as well as how to test it for yourself below.

Fertilizing and liming is a must in the fall months. You have to provide your lawn with the essentially nutrients prior to dormancy. However, doing these things alone won't guarantee a perfect spring green-up. We've listed the top 5 fall lawn care tips to accomplish over the next week or so to help ensure a healthy, green lawn next spring.

When talking turf and it’s diseases, fall is the time for fixing damages brought by the typical summer heat and preparing for the problems of spring.

Green Lawn Fertilizing offers dedicated lime applications, responsible for raising the soil pH. Lime can help improve availability of nutrients and supply calcium and thus help the turf grow better.

Earth Day 2013

Earth Day 2013

Homeowners can reduce their carbon footprint and water usage this Earth Day by planting an environmentally friendly lawn!

Liming Your Turf

Liming Your Turf

pH is the degree of acidity of your soil and can range from 0 to 14. Soils below 7.0 become more acidic due to both human and natural activities.